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The Beginner’s Guide to the 5:2 Diet

The Beginner’s Guide to the 5:2 Diet

  • September 21, 2020
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There are very few studies on the 5:2 diet specifically.

However, there are plenty of studies on intermittent fasting in general, which show impressive health benefits (2, 3).

One important benefit is that intermittent fasting seems to be easier to follow than continuous calorie restriction, at least for some people (4, 5).

Also, many studies have shown that different types of intermittent fasting may significantly reduce insulin levels (2, 6, 7).

One study showed that the 5:2 diet caused weight loss similar to regular calorie restriction. Additionally, the diet was very effective at reducing insulin levels and improving insulin sensitivity (8).

Several studies have looked into the health effects of modified alternate-day fasting, which is very similar to the 5:2 diet (ultimately, it’s a 4:3 diet) (9).

The 4:3 diet may help reduce insulin resistance, asthma, seasonal allergies, heart arrhythmias, menopausal hot flashes and more (10, 11).

One randomized controlled study in both normal-weight and overweight individuals showed major improvements in the group doing 4:3 fasting, compared to the control group that ate normally (12).

After 12 weeks, the fasting group had:

  • Reduced body weight by more than 11 pounds (5 kg).
  • Reduced fat mass by 7.7 pounds (3.5 kg), with no change in muscle mass.
  • Reduced blood levels of triglycerides by 20%.
  • Increased LDL particle size, which is a good thing.
  • Reduced levels of CRP, an important marker of inflammation.
  • Decreased levels of leptin by up to 40%.

Summary

The 5:2 diet may have several impressive health benefits, including weight loss, reduced insulin resistance and decreased inflammation. It may also improve blood lipids.

For original article click here

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